If aliens really are coming here. Where might they be coming from? We look at our 10 celestial neighbours.

If aliens are coming to earth as theorists believe and our ancient texts and histories tell us.
Where might they be coming from? We look at our 10 neighbouring celestial stars

There is much to suggest we may have been visited by extra-terrestrials in the past and many who claim we are still being visited today. If alien beings are really making trips from across the vastness of space to visit our pale blue dot, the third planet in the Sol system, where might it be they are coming from? We take a look at our solar celestial neighbours in wonder.

A light-year is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year – in a single second light travels 186,282 miles. Which means light travels 5,878,625,373,183.608 miles in a year.

1 Proxima Centauri
The closest star to our own solar system will not always be closest, but it will be a long time before that happens. Proxima Centauri is the third star in the Alpha Centauri star system, also known as Alpha Centauri C.
Distance: 4.2 Light years



Proxima centauri

Proxima Centuri




2. Rigil Kentaurus
The second closest star is well, a tie between the sister stars of Proxima Centauri. Alpha Centauri A and B make up the other two stars of the triple star system Alpha Centauri.
Distance: 4.3 Light years

rigil kenataurus

Rigil kenataurus




3. Barnard’s Star
A faint red dwarf star, discovered in 1916 by E. E. Barnard, recent efforts to discover planets around Barnard’s Star have failed. Distance: 5.9 LY

Distance: 5.9 Light years


4. Wolf 359
Known to many as the location of the famous battle on Star Trek the Next generation, Wolf 359 is a red dwarf. It is so small that if it were to replace our sun, an observer on Earth would need a telescope to see it clearly.

Distance: 7.7 Light years

Wolf 359

Wolf 359




5. Lalande 21185
While it is the fifth closest star to our own sun, Lalande 21185 is too faint to be seen with the naked eye.

Distance: 8.26 Light years

Lalande 21185

Lalande 21185





6. Luyten 726-8A and B
Discovered by Willem Jacob Luyten (1899-1994), both Luyten 726-8A 726-8B are red dwarfs and too faint to be seen with the naked eye, when looking to the sky.

Distance: 8.73 Light years



7. Sirius A and B
Sirius, also known as the Dog Star and the guiding star, is the brightest star in the sky. Sirius B, the companion, has received considerable attention itself, since it is the first white dwarf with a spectrum to show a gravitational red shift as predicted by the general theory of relativity. And in recent months it has been discovered to have a third in the star system-Sirius C.

Distance: 8.6 Light years

Sirius A and B

Sirius A and B

Dogon tool, a ancient Orrery

Dogon tool, a ancient Orrery




8. Ross 154
Ross 154 appears to be a flare star, which means that it can increase its brightness by a factor of 10 or more before reverting to its normal state.

Distance: 9.693 Light years

9. Ross 248
While it is now the ninth closest star to our solar system, around the year 38000AD, the red dwarf Ross 248 will take the place of Proxima Centauri as the closest star to us.

Distance: 10.32 Light years

10. Epsilon Eridani
Eridani is our tenth nearest star, and the closest star known to have a planet, Epsilon Eridani B. It is the third closest star that is viewable without a telescope.

Distance 10.5 Light years

A glimpse into the history of big cats in Britain.

Big cats in Britain

In the very first edition of Beyond the Line e-Magazine, cryptozoology has many and varied subjects within it, from the chupacabra to the domestic hamster. However in Britain, it seems, the Big Cats are the most well known of these enigmatic creatures. They’re not just the most well known, they’re also one of the most common mysteries encountered in Britain. So lets look through a brief history of Big Cat sightings and encounters in Britain. 

The first ever possible recorded sighting of mysterious big cats in Britain was in a book from the 1760s, entitled Rural Rides by the radical writer William Cobbett. In it he details seeing a cat “as big as a middle-sized Spaniel dog” climb into a hollow elm tree in the ruined Westerley abbey in Farnham near Surrey. Later he saw a “lucifee” (North American lynx) “and it seemed to me to be just such a cat as I had seen at Waverley.” Another old report was found by David Walker from The Times in 1827 of a “lynx” being seen, and the Big Cats in Britain have a report of a tiger being seen in Scotland in 1927!

 

Even further back there’s a medieval Welsh poem, called Pa Gwr in the Black Book of Carmarthen, which mentions a Cath Palug, meaning “Palug’s cat” or “clawing cat”, which roamed Anglesey until it was killed.

 

There is a quiet period for many years, up until the 1960-1970s when it became fashionable for people to keep imported big cats of all sizes and species as exotic pets. It is unsurprising then that a spate of sightings of big cats roaming the countryside happened during that time. Even more so when you consider the Act that was brought about in 1976 when authorities realized that unless looked after properly these still wild animals were a danger to those who kept them. The Dangerous Animals Act of 1976 required all owners of their pet big cats to have a licence, insurance and one certain space where the animal could be kept. Of course, a lot of people keeping these animals could not afford this nor bear to part from them or have them taken away, so rather than handing them over they instead released them into the wild. It’s believed by a lot of people that this is the main reason for the sightings in Britain then and now, as it is possible that these released animals could have established a breeding population. I happen to {mostly) disagree, but that’s for another big cat related article. 

 

The Nottingham Lion was first reported in 1976 by two milkmen in Tollerton, but despite a search by police and citizens for the animal, they could not find any evidence of it’s existence, despite the total of 65 reports they received.  

The reported Beast of Bodmin Moor is (or was) more than likely one of these creatures, as it appeared shortly after the Act was put in place. From 1983 onwards, there have been at least 60 recorded sightings of big cats in that area to the present day. This at the very least signifies that a large cat like creature was roaming that area for a long time. 

 

The Beast of Exmoor, first sighted roaming the moors in the 1970s (escaped or released pet by a distraught owner perhaps?). However this particular beast did not gain it’s fame until 1983, when a farmer claimed to have lost over 100 sheep in the space of three months, all with injuries to the throat. There have been sporadic reports since then, even three photographs of the beast, but no conclusive evidence has yet been found. 

The Surrey Puma of the 1960s has been joined by the Fen Tiger, the Beast of Ongar, the Pedmore Panther, the Beast of Gloucester, the Thing from the Ling, the Beast of Borehamwood, the Wrangaton Lion, the Beast of Shap, the Beast of Brentwood, the Lindsey Leopard, the Lincolnshire Lynx, the Wildcat of the Wolds, the Beast of Roslin, the Kilmacolm Big Cat, the Beast of Burford, the Chilterns Lion, the Beast of Castor, the Beast of Sydenham, the Shooters Hill Cheetah, the Beast of Bucks, the Plumstead Panther, the Beast of Bexley, the Beast of Barnet, the Nottingham Lion, the Durham Puma, the Horndon Panther, the Beast of Cricklewood, the Beast of Bont, the Beast of Gobowen and that’s not even all of them. 

________________________________________________________________________

Some reports

In 1993 an ocelot was tentatively identified living in Britain. 

 

In 2001 in May, a Lynx nicknamed “Lara” was captured in Cricklewood, North London. No zoos or circuses reported an animal missing during that time, so either it was an escaped, unregistered and unlicensed pet, it was a part of a relic lynx population (the European lynx lived in Britain up until 500 AD, when it apparently became extinct), or it was a part of a population of those cats established during the mass release of the 1970s. 

 

Many reports of big cats were made during the year of 2003, including sightings of lions. leopards and pumas. 

In 2004, the BBCS reported over 2123 sightings of big cats in Britain, that was published in the BBC Wildlife Magazine. A Warwickshire gamekeeper reported seeing a large black cat poaching his pheasants before taking off when it saw him that same year.

 

2006 a man was trimming his hedge when a large black cat emerged from it, studied the stunned fellow and strolled off. A woman also reported a large black cat bounding across the road in front of her when she was driving near Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

 

In 2007, reported by Big Cats in Britain, two people watched a big cat in their garden at High Hesleden.

 

July 2008, a big cat was filmed near a military base in Scotland, as reported by The Telegraph.

 

A tweet sent out by Norwich police this February calling for witnesses to a large cat prowling the city, which was picked up by the BBC.

 

There have been many reported sightings this year, many of course reported by the BCIB, including a couple who saw a very large cat in their garden near Haden Bridge hop the fence and walk away, a woman who saw a large cat near her home in Scotland chase some deer into a wood and a golden coloured cat running across the road from Hopwas Wood in Whittington. Fortean Times also reported two instances this year of people seeing lynxes-once with a cub! And this isn’t even the half of it, for this year alone.

Big Cats clearly have been reported in Britain for a while, since even before the craze of the 1960-1970s, and they’re definitely not going anywhere soon – judging by the constant flow of reports. You never know, if you keep an eye out, you might get lucky and have a sighting of your own.

 

See you on the other side,

Sylvia Wix

Presentation details and title screen


“Large sunken islands, tales of the ancient gods, preceltic history and artifacts.
Earth mysteries and ancient mythology, technology of the gods and the revelations of genetics.
Egyptian history and the strong connection between all of them”
Yes, my bad. It’s a long title. Really did try to make it smaller, but nothing seemed to encompass the areas at which we are going to look at and expand upon.



The presentation will be at the monthly Empryean meeting held at the Theosophical Hall, next to the Old Saluation Inn, on Maid Marian way, Nottingham.
January 4th 2012
Doors open at 7.30pm and talk starts at 8pm
On the door is 4pounds adult and 2.50pound the unwaged

http://www.nottinghamempryean.co.uk

Really hope you can attend,

“The unexplained and the paranormal is about more than just ghosthunting”

Journal submission research article/project: “Just what are investigators really doing?”

One of the data research projects we have under way at the moment is discovering how and what paranormal investigative and ghost hunting teams do. We have been in contact with a number of teams who we hope will participate in our data gathering survey. You could say in many ways this is a press release of our intention and why

We will endeavor by way of questionnaire and survey, look to learn the conduct, methodology and working principals of active investigators and groups in the field of paranormal investigation. Going on a ghost hunt at a location with “x” event organizers, that is apparently haunted. Is this really investigating the unexplained?
Do groups use the process of elimination, if so, do groups have structured guide for this? Do groups participate in active research of anomalous phenomena? Do groups keep up to date on developments and news? Is the aim to become a business selling events and tours as many have done? Do “paranormal” groups actually look into other areas of the unexplained besides ghosts? What equipment do groups actually have apparent success with? Have they published their findings? Do groups communicate with separate investigation teams to compare documentation and gathered data?

With the most important question is – What are we actually doing to document and prove the paranormal?

These are just a few examples of the questions that get raised the most often. We are going to discover of the investigation organizations and groups that participate and respond – just what investigators are really doing?

Paranormal Network.

“We come with a message” audio introduction available now

Paranormal Network launched an introduction to our audio presentations and productions today, entitled “We come with a message”.

Listen at http://www.Paranormalnetwork.co.uk. On the audio player – “We come with a message”

Its around 45secs in length, so if you could take the time to give a listen. share your comments, feedback and thoughts, we would greatly appreciate it.

Kristian Lander
http://www.Paranormalnetwork.co.uk